Immune cell variations contribute to malaria severity

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a technology whereby two robots can work in unison to 3-D-print a concrete structure. This method of concurrent 3-D printing, known as swarm printing, paves the way for a team of mobile robots to print even bigger structures in the future. Developed by Assistant Professor Pham Quang Cuong and his team at NTU's Singapore Centre for 3-D Printing, this new multi-robot technology is reported in Automation in Construction. The NTU scientist was also behind the Ikea Bot project earlier this year, in which two robots assembled an Ikea chair in about nine minutes.

Immune cell variations contribute to malaria severity

At least 250 million people are infected with malaria every year, and about half a million of those die from the disease. A new study from MIT offers a possible explanation for why some people ...

Thu 4 Oct 18 from Medical Xpress

Scientists develop smart technology for synchronized 3-D printing of concrete

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a technology whereby two robots can work in unison to 3-D-print a concrete structure. This method of ...

Wed 3 Oct 18 from Phys.org

Robots work together to build 3D-printed concrete structure

Scientists in Singapore have developed a technology that allows two robots to work together to 3D-print a concrete structure. Dubbed swarm printing, the method of concurrent 3D-printing from ...

Tue 2 Oct 18 from The Engineer

MIT, SMART and NTU scientists have discovered a potential treatment for severe malaria

Scientists from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have discovered ...

Tue 9 Oct 18 from Eurekalert

How malaria infection activates natural killer cells

Malaria-infected red blood cells trigger the immune system's first line of defense by releasing small vesicles that activate a pathogen recognition receptor called MDA5, according to a new study. ...

Thu 4 Oct 18 from ScienceDaily

NTU Singapore scientists develop smart technology for synchronized 3D printing of concrete

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore have developed a technology where two robots can work in unison to 3D-print a concrete structure.

Tue 2 Oct 18 from Eurekalert

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