Engineers make Black Mirror-like robotic insects, powered by lasers - CNET (page 2)

Engineers at the University of Washington have used a laser to wirelessly power a robot insect for the first time. (Credit: Mark Stone/UW) RoboFly has a tiny photovoltaic cell that coverts energy from a laser beam into electricity to power its flight. Until now, robotic insects such as Harvard’s RoboBee have been tethered to the […] The post Laser energy helps wireless robot insect take flight appeared first on The Engineer.

Engineers make Black Mirror-like robotic insects, powered by lasers - CNET

Last episode of season 3: Robot bees kill loads of people. Don't say they didn't warn us.

Wed 16 May 18 from CNET Cutting Edge

Watch a laser-powered RoboFly flap its tiny wings

Making something fly involves a lot of tradeoffs. Bigger stuff can hold more fuel or batteries, but too big and the lift required is too much. Small stuff takes less lift to fly but might not ...

Tue 15 May 18 from TechCrunch

Robotic insect takes flight powered by frickin' laser beams

Miniscule robotic drones might be the future, but they've been tricky to get off the ground. Until now, any wing-flapping insect robot had to have a power source, making it too ...

Tue 15 May 18 from Engadget

RoboFly Is the First Wireless Insectoid Robot to Take Flight

A team of engineers from the University of Washington has developed the first insectoid robot that can take flight without a power cable. The post RoboFly Is the First Wireless Insectoid Robot ...

Tue 15 May 18 from Extremetech

Laser energy helps wireless robot insect take flight

Engineers at the University of Washington have used a laser to wirelessly power a robot insect for the first time. (Credit: Mark Stone/UW) RoboFly has a tiny photovoltaic cell that coverts energy ...

Wed 16 May 18 from The Engineer

This Insect-Sized Flying Robot Is Powered by Lasers

Tue 15 May 18 from Wired Science

The first wireless flying robotic insect takes off

Engineers have created RoboFly, the first wireless flying robotic insect. RoboFly is slightly heavier than a toothpick and is powered by a laser beam.

Tue 15 May 18 from ScienceDaily

The First Wireless Flying Robotic Insect Takes Off, Tue 15 May 18 from Newswise

The first wireless flying robotic insect takes off, Tue 15 May 18 from Eurekalert

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