Are face-reading blimps and quadcopters in "top hats" the future of drone safety?

As more drones and autonomous aerial vehicles crowd into the airspace, we're going to need some measures to keep them from crashing into each other. Air traffic control networks are in development, but the human touch won't always be practical at a large scale, so researchers at Georgia Tech are teaching drones a few simple rules to help them avoid collisions on their own. When humans do need to interact with the drones, an autonomous blimp, kitted out with gesture and facial recognition, could be our mediator... Continue Reading Are face-reading blimps and quadcopters in "top hats" the future of drone safety? Category: Robotics Tags: Blimp drones Drone safety Facial Recognition Georgia Tech Gesture Control Swarm Robotics Related Articles: Drones cleared to carry lab samples between Swiss hospitals 7-Eleven deploys donut delivery drone

Are face-reading blimps and quadcopters in "top hats" the future of drone safety?

As more drones and autonomous aerial vehicles crowd into the airspace, we're going to need some measures to keep them from crashing into each other. Air traffic control networks are ...

Tue 16 May 17 from Gizmag

Virtual top hats allow swarming robots to fly in tight formation

Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have created a team of free-flying robots that obeys the two rules of the air: don't collide or undercut each other. They've also built autonomous ...

Mon 15 May 17 from TechXplore

Virtual top hats allow swarming robots to fly in tight formation, Mon 15 May 17 from ScienceDaily

Virtual top hats allow swarming robots to fly in tight formation, Mon 15 May 17 from Eurekalert

Researchers reveal a mini facial recognition balloon blimp

The blimp could be useful when shopping at large stores, as it would be able to interact with humans and guide them to the correct aisle, Georgia Institute of Technology researchers claim. ...

Tue 16 May 17 from Daily Mail

Virtual 'top hats' ensure swarming drones won't crash

Drone swarms can be used for lots of things, like creating holograms, putting on a Superbowl halftime show or collecting military intelligence. One of the problems with a bunch of quadcopters ...

Mon 15 May 17 from Engadget

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