Scientists left camera traps to record wild apes—watch what happens

Researchers analyzed video from remote camera-trap devices placed in ape-populated forests throughout Africa to see how wild apes would react to these unfamiliar objects. Responses varied by species and even among individuals within the same species, but one thing was consistent throughout: the apes definitely noticed the cameras—they poked them, stared at them, and occasionally tried to bite them. The study appears March 14 in the journal Current Biology.

Scientists left camera traps to record wild apes—watch what happens

Researchers analyzed video from remote camera-trap devices placed in ape-populated forests throughout Africa to see how wild apes would react to these unfamiliar objects. Responses varied by ...

Thu 14 Mar 19 from Phys.org

Here’s What Happened When Scientists Left Camera Traps to Record Wild Apes

How do wild apes react to unfamiliar objects, such as monitoring equipment, in their natural habitats? To find out, scientists deployed remote camera-trap devices in ape-populated forests throughout ...

Fri 15 Mar 19 from Geek.com

Camera traps capture fascinating footage of apes in their natural habitat

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany said the goal of the experiment was to see if the presence of research equipment had any effect on behaviour.

Thu 14 Mar 19 from Daily Mail

Wild African ape reactions to novel camera traps

An international team of researchers analyzed video from remote camera-trap devices placed in ape-populated forests throughout Africa to see how wild apes would react to these unfamiliar objects. ...

Thu 14 Mar 19 from ScienceDaily

Wild African ape reactions to novel camera traps, Thu 14 Mar 19 from Eurekalert

  • Pages: 1

Bookmark

Bookmark and Share