Resonant mechanism discovery could inspire ultra-thin acoustic absorbers

Moths are a mainstay food source for bats, which use echolocation to hunt their prey. Scientists are studying how moths have evolved passive defenses over millions of years to resist their primary predators. While some moths have evolved ears that detect the ultrasonic calls of bats, many types of moths remain deaf. In those moths, researchers have found that the insects developed types of 'stealth coating' that serve as acoustic camouflage to evade hungry bats.

Resonant mechanism discovery could inspire ultra-thin acoustic absorbers

New research led by academics at the University of Bristol has discovered that the scales on moth wings vibrate and can absorb the sound frequencies used by bats for echolocation (biological ...

Mon 12 Nov 18 from Phys.org

Moths survive bat predation through acoustic camouflage fur

Moths are a mainstay food source for bats, which use echolocation (biological sonar) to hunt their prey. Scientists such as Thomas Neil, from the University of Bristol in the U.K., are studying ...

Tue 6 Nov 18 from Phys.org

Moths Survive Bat Predation Through Acoustic Camouflage Fur, Wed 7 Nov 18 from Laboratory Equipment

Moths survive bat predation through acoustic camouflage fur, Tue 6 Nov 18 from ScienceDaily

Moths have thick fur to stop bats hearing them fly, scientist finds

Thomas Neil from Bristol University found the insects have developed what he calls a 'stealth coating' that serves as an acoustic cover.

Tue 6 Nov 18 from Daily Mail

Deaf moths use acoustic camouflage to escape bats

It's an evolutionary arms race.

Tue 6 Nov 18 from ZME Science

Sound-absorbing fur helps moths avoid bat predation

The fur on the thorax of some moths absorbs the sound waves emitted by bats and their sonar systems, making them harder to detect, according to a new study.

Tue 6 Nov 18 from UPI

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