My host is my castle—bats as hosts

Despite researchers having little fondness for them, a large fraction of the world's biodiversity consists of parasites. Natural populations of organisms are often strongly affected by factors of their environment, most notably the effect of predators. Yet, the most outstanding arms race, produced by millions of years of coevolution, is seen between parasites and their hosts. Bats, the second-most diverse mammal order worldwide, are parasitized by numerous lineages of arthropods; bat flies are the most conspicuous. In turn, bat flies themselves can be parasitized by Laboulbeniales, fungal biotrophs of arthropods. This example of hyperparasitism—a condition where a secondary parasite develops within or on another parasite—of bats, bat flies and fungi, is a severely understudied phenomenon.

My host is my castle—bats as hosts

Despite researchers having little fondness for them, a large fraction of the world's biodiversity consists of parasites. Natural populations of organisms are often strongly affected by factors ...

Wed 8 Aug 18 from Phys.org

My host is my castle

Bat flies have been studied in a variety of contexts, including host associations and specificity, how bat ecology and roosting biology affects parasitism, and how fly morphology functions to ...

Wed 8 Aug 18 from Eurekalert

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