In an ant's world, the smaller you are, the harder it is to see obstacles

Ants are scary. They have a remorseless quality, seemingly indifferent to their individual welfare, their whole lives submerged in the collective. And that's just the small ones. Super-sized versions are the stuff of classic horror, radioactively enhanced, famously threatening American cities from down the storm drains in Them! to terrorising Joan Collins up the jungle in Empire of the Ants.

In an ant's world, the smaller you are, the harder it is to see obstacles

Look around your home or garden, or while out for a walk in the bush, and you'll soon find plenty of ants of all shapes and sizes making their way around the place.

Wed 18 Apr 18 from Phys.org

These ants have evolved a complex system of battlefield triage and rescue

Ants are scary. They have a remorseless quality, seemingly indifferent to their individual welfare, their whole lives submerged in the collective. And that's just the small ones. Super-sized ...

Tue 17 Apr 18 from Phys.org

Ants prefer a hard-earned treat

We are not exactly closely related to ants, but our brains have one surprising similarity: we both value highly the prize we get after a hard day's work.

Mon 16 Apr 18 from Phys.org

Having one eye better than the other may explain ants' left bias

Unlike Derek Zoolander, ants don't have any difficulty turning left. New research from the University of Bristol has now found rock ants often have one eye slightly better than the other, which ...

Wed 11 Apr 18 from Phys.org

Having one eye better than the other may explain ants' left bias, Wed 11 Apr 18 from ScienceDaily

Having one eye better than the other may explain ants' left bias, Wed 11 Apr 18 from Eurekalert

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