In stingless bee species, queens control worker reproduction without castration

Scientists have studied the organization and function of social insect colonies since Charles Darwin (1809-1882) investigated beehives near his home in Kent with the help of his five children. Since then, prompted by the theory of evolution, researchers have scrutinized every conceivable aspect of the life of bees. Decades ago, scientists discovered that in the nests of many species of European honeybees (genus Apis) in which healthy young queens regularly lay eggs, the queen uses chemical compounds called pheromones to inhibit worker reproduction.

In stingless bee species, queens control worker reproduction without castration

Scientists have studied the organization and function of social insect colonies since Charles Darwin (1809-1882) investigated beehives near his home in Kent with the help of his five children. ...

Wed 13 Sep 17 from Phys.org

Queens control worker reproduction without castration in stingless bee species

Study contradicts the view that worker bees are forcibly castrated by the queen among the 600-odd species of stingless bees widely distributed in tropical and subtropical regions of the world.

Tue 12 Sep 17 from Eurekalert

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