Plants & Animals News


The mystery behind the proboscis monkey's big nose

Exaggerated male traits, such as a large nose, can be great for attracting females, finds a study of proboscis monkeys in Malaysia.

1 hours ago from Phys.org

Other sources: Phys.org, National Geographic show all (3) »

Distinguishing males from females among king penguins

It is difficult to distinguish males from females among King Penguins, but a new Ibis study reveals that King Penguins can be sexed with an accuracy of 100% based on the sex-specific syllable ...

3 hours ago from Phys.org

Other sources: Phys.org show all (2) »

Scientists create 'Evolutionwatch' for plants

Using a hitchhiking weed, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology reveal for the first time the mutation rate of a plant growing in the wild.

12 hours ago from Phys.org

Other sources: Phys.org, ScienceDaily show all (3) »

Team finds the movement behavior of an anole species to be more dynamic than previously thought

Anolis lizards have a thing or two to teach humans about love—or in scientific speak, sexual selection—at least when it comes to territoriality.

17 hours ago from Phys.org

Other sources: Phys.org, ScienceDaily show all (3) »

The conflict between males and females could replace the evolution of new species

New research shows that males and females of the same species can evolve to be so different that they prevent other species from evolving or colonising habitats, challenging long-held theories ...

20 hours ago from Phys.org

Other sources: Phys.org show all (2) »

Long incubation times may defend birds against parasites

Some tropical birds have longer egg incubation times than their temperate cousins, even though their habitat is teeming with egg-eating predators. The reason why has long been a mystery, but ...

20 hours ago from Phys.org

Other sources: Phys.org show all (2) »

Study shows, for the first time, that porpoises flee from and stop feeding when disturbed by heavy ship noise

Porpoises communicate with each other using sounds. Therefore, they are highly sensitive to noise, such as ship noise. And the Danish belts and sounds are some of the most heavily trafficked ...

22 hours ago from Phys.org

Other sources: Phys.org, ScienceDaily show all (3) »

Using sounds and behaviour to keep birds from dangers like wind turbines

It could save the lives of millions of birds.

Mon 19 Feb 18 from ZME Science

Other sources: ZME Science show all (2) »

High-altitude birds evolve similar traits via different mutations

On the Himalayan-enveloped Tibetan Plateau and the Altiplano plateau of South America – the world's two highest tabletops – a select few bird species survive on 35 to 40 percent less oxygen ...

Mon 19 Feb 18 from Phys.org

Other sources: Phys.org show all (2) »

In Kenya, anti-poaching dogs are wildlife's best friends

Five-month-old bloodhound Shakaria gambols through the long savannah grasses of Kenya's Maasai Mara reserve, her playful mood swiftly turning to keen determination as she is ordered to track ...

Mon 19 Feb 18 from Phys.org

Other sources: Phys.org show all (2) »

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