Detecting bacteria such as E. coli in minutes

Finding a drug to either kill harmful bacteria or slow their growth has been a priority for medical practitioners for thousands of years. Not all antibiotics have been effective or even safe, although herbs, honey and moldy bread poultices used in ancient Greece, Rome, China and Egypt were used with some success.1 Needless to say, as scientists experimented with treatment possibilities and resorted to things like animal feces, heavy metals like mercury, bismuth and arsenic to eradicate sexually transmitted diseases such as gonorrhea and syphilis via specially designed syringes, the "administration and side effects often proved worse than the disease."2 The Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy references many attempts over centuries to nail down a definitive antibiotic, and several showed great promise, such as Pyocyanase, derived from a green bacteria isolated from injured peoples' bandages, which slowed the growth of other microbes. "They grew the organism (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) in batches and used the su

Detecting bacteria such as E. coli in minutes

A discovery by researchers at the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick offers a new technology for detecting bacteria in minutes by 'zapping' the bacteria with electricity.

Wed 12 Jun 19 from Phys.org

Could cranberries combat superbugs?

Finding a drug to either kill harmful bacteria or slow their growth has been a priority for medical practitioners for thousands of years. Not all antibiotics have been effective or even safe, ...

Mon 10 Jun 19 from Mercola

Bacteria such as E. coli detected in minutes by new tech

Scientists have discovered that healthy bacteria cells and cells inhibited by antibiotics or UV light show completely different electric reactions. These findings could lead to the development ...

Wed 12 Jun 19 from ScienceDaily

Bacteria such as E. coli detected in minutes by new technology from Warwick University

(University of Warwick) University of Warwick scientists have discovered that healthy bacteria cells and cells inhibited by antibiotics or UV light show completely different electric reactions. ...

Wed 12 Jun 19 from Eurekalert

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