Image of the Day: Tiny Vandals

What's a feast for the human eye may be a literal feast for microorganisms that colonize works of art, according to a new study in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Elisabetta Caselli of the University of Ferrara, Italy, and colleagues. The researchers characterized the microbial community on a 17th century painting and showed that while some microbes destroy such works of art, others might be employed to protect them.

Image of the Day: Tiny Vandals

Researchers nab the microbial culprits eating away at a 17th century painting.

Thu 6 Dec 18 from The Scientist

Bacteria could protect old paintings from pigment-eating microbes

The microbiome of a 400-year-old painting includes bacteria and fungi that eat pigments but a treatment with other microbes can protect the painting from damage

Wed 5 Dec 18 from Newscientist

A detailed look at the microorganisms that colonize, and degrade, a 400-year-old painting

What's a feast for the human eye may be a literal feast for microorganisms that colonize works of art, according to a new study in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Elisabetta Caselli of the ...

Wed 5 Dec 18 from Phys.org

A detailed look at the microorganisms that colonize, and degrade, a 400-year-old painting, Wed 5 Dec 18 from ScienceDaily

Art-eating microbes that have devoured historic works have been caught red-handed

To find these microorganisms, scientists from the University of Ferrara looked at a piece called 'Incoronazione della Virgine' completed by Italian artist Carlo Bononi in 1620.

Wed 5 Dec 18 from Daily Mail

Scientists survey the microbes eating a 17th century painting

When researchers in Italy took a closer look at the canvas of a 17th century painting, they found an array of microorganisms.

Thu 6 Dec 18 from UPI

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