Image of the Day: Tiny Vandals

Scientists found an army of microbes feeding on a 17th-century canvas. Then they declared war. Paintings can be damaged by humidity, sunlight, and countless other things–but what about bacteria? Italian researchers have discovered that old paintings are colonized by bacteria that constantly munch on them, destroying the artwork over time. And thankfully, they’ve also discovered that adding more bacteria to kill the destructive organisms can help preserve them.Read Full Story

Image of the Day: Tiny Vandals

Researchers nab the microbial culprits eating away at a 17th century painting.

Thu 6 Dec 18 from The Scientist

Bacteria could protect old paintings from pigment-eating microbes

The microbiome of a 400-year-old painting includes bacteria and fungi that eat pigments but a treatment with other microbes can protect the painting from damage

Wed 5 Dec 18 from Newscientist

A detailed look at the microorganisms that colonize, and degrade, a 400-year-old painting

What's a feast for the human eye may be a literal feast for microorganisms that colonize works of art, according to a new study in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Elisabetta Caselli of the ...

Wed 5 Dec 18 from Phys.org

A detailed look at the microorganisms that colonize, and degrade, a 400-year-old painting, Wed 5 Dec 18 from ScienceDaily

What’s eating this 400-year-old painting? A whole ecosystem of microbes

Microbes are everywhere, even between layers of paint on classic works of art.

Tue 11 Dec 18 from Ars Technica

Every work of art has its own microbiome. Most could use a probiotic.

Science Italian scientists analyzed the microbial colonization on a historic easel painting. Italian scientists performed one of the first analyses of microbial colonization ...

Thu 6 Dec 18 from Popular Science

Art-eating microbes that have devoured historic works have been caught red-handed

To find these microorganisms, scientists from the University of Ferrara looked at a piece called 'Incoronazione della Virgine' completed by Italian artist Carlo Bononi in 1620.

Wed 5 Dec 18 from Daily Mail

The future of art preservation is bacteria warfare

Scientists found an army of microbes feeding on a 17th-century canvas. Then they declared war. Paintings can be damaged by humidity, sunlight, and countless other things–but what about ...

Tue 11 Dec 18 from Fastcompany Tech

Scientists survey the microbes eating a 17th century painting

When researchers in Italy took a closer look at the canvas of a 17th century painting, they found an array of microorganisms.

Thu 6 Dec 18 from UPI

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