The Greek astronomer Hipparchus of Nicaea was thought to have invented trigonometry, but it appears the Babylonians beat him to it by more than 1,000 years. (page 2)

Credit: University of New South Wales/Andrew KellyPlimpton 322, a 3,700-year-old Babylonian clay tablet, was shrouded in mystery after it surfaced in the early 1900s. Scavengers likely found the tablet in what is now Iraq and sold it to an antiques dealer, who then passed it on to an American antiquities enthusiast named Edgar Banks.Banks, who was also a diplomat and roving archaeologist, worked for a time at the American consul in Baghdad. His global exploits are thought to have inspired the fictional character Indiana Jones, the protagonist of the famous film franchise.   Banks is credited with first recognizing the importance of Plimpton 322, which he sold to New York publisher George Arthur Plimpton. Plimpton housed the artifact in his private collection. Upon Plimpton’s death in 1936, it was donated to Columbia University, where it has remained ever since.   Researchers have puzzled over the tablet’s meaning throughout the decades, but it was never fully deciphered — until now.

The Greek astronomer Hipparchus of Nicaea was thought to have invented trigonometry, but it appears the Babylonians beat him to it by more than 1,000 years.

Credit: University of New South Wales/Andrew KellyPlimpton 322, a 3,700-year-old Babylonian clay tablet, was shrouded in mystery after it surfaced in the early 1900s. Scavengers ...

Thu 24 Aug 17 from Discovery News

Babylonians beat Greeks to trigonometry by 1,000 years

Researchers at the University of New South Wales in Sydney believe they have cracked the complex mathematical code of a 3,700-year old clay tablet.

Thu 24 Aug 17 from Daily Mail

World's first trigonometry revealed in ancient Babylonian tablet

The ancient Babylonians had a long forgotten understanding of right-angled triangles that was simpler and more accurate than the trigonometry we are taught.

Fri 25 Aug 17 from UPI

Mathematical Mystery of Ancient Babylonian Clay Tablet Solved

NewsScientists discovered the purpose of a famous 3,700-year-old Babylonian clay tablet, revealing it is the world's oldest and most accurate trigonometric table, possibly used by ancient mathematical ...

Fri 25 Aug 17 from Laboratory Equipment

Mathematical mystery of ancient Babylonian clay tablet solved, Thu 24 Aug 17 from ScienceDaily

Mysterious ‘Plimpton 322’ tablet’s secret revealed

Australian scientists appear to have cracked the code of a 3,700-year old Babylonian clay tablet. It is, they reckon, the world’s oldest (and most accurate) trigonometric table, and could ...

Thu 24 Aug 17 from Science Blog

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