Some moths behave like butterflies to mate

For many evolutionary biologists, nothing gets their dander up faster than suggesting evolution is anything other than the process of natural selection, acting on random mutations. So some are uneasy that the John Templeton Foundation has awarded $8.7 million to U.K., Swedish, and U.S. researchers for experimental and theoretical work intended to put a revisionist view of evolution, the so-called extended evolutionary synthesis, on a sounder footing. Using a variety of plants, animals, and microbes, the researchers will study the possibility that organisms can influence their own evolution and that inheritance can take place through routes other than the genetic material. Critics are against evolutionary biologists accepting this money and argue that evolutionary theory already embraces the best of these ideas. But others are pleased as the money should help clarify the importance of different aspects of the extended synthesis. Author: Elizabeth Pennisi

Some moths behave like butterflies to mate

Thu 28 Apr 16 from Phys.org

New pathogen takes control of gypsy moth populations

A new fungal pathogen is killing gypsy moth caterpillars and crowding out communities of pathogens and parasites that previously destroyed these moth pests.

Mon 25 Apr 16 from Phys.org

Pathogen Takes Control of Invasive Gypsy Moths, Mon 25 Apr 16 from Laboratory Equipment

[In Depth] Templeton grant funds evolution rethink

For many evolutionary biologists, nothing gets their dander up faster than suggesting evolution is anything other than the process of natural selection, acting on random mutations. So some are ...

Thu 21 Apr 16 from Science Now

National Geographic Launches Face Swap Campaign to Encourage Empathy, What Could Possibly Go Wrong? 

Brands have been latching onto millennial trends in an attempt to stay current since the beginning of time, and it is almost always ill-advised. Unfortunately, National Geographic has yet to ...

Wed 27 Apr 16 from Gizmodo

How finances influence your search for a mate

Like it or not, money has a say in whether people get into or stay in romantic relationships.

Fri 22 Apr 16 from FOXNews

DNA's ability to regulate separated genes gave birth to animals

According to this new project, the great innovation differentiating animals from their unicellular relatives is the distal gene regulation.

Sat 23 Apr 16 from HealthCanal

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