Deformable thermoelectric materials add a new twist to the design of energy-scavenging devices

Devices that generate electricity through the thermoelectric effect – that is, the conversion of differences in temperature to an electric voltage – are showing up in everything from clothing to paint, and they could go a long way towards reclaiming some of the heat lost during energy production. Now researchers at the University of Utah have developed a thermoelectric material that doesn't use the toxic chemicals common in others, but is still efficient and affordable enough for use in everyday products... Continue Reading Charging your phone with a cooking pot? New material could make it possible Category: Energy Tags: Thermoelectricity Electricity University of Utah Materials Related Articles: ?ezeta scooter celebrates its 60th birthday by going electric Low-riding zec00 electric motorcycle enters production Review: Hitting the streets with

Deformable thermoelectric materials add a new twist to the design of energy-scavenging devices

Adding elasticity to the impressive properties of materials known as thermoelectrics could help us conserve more power, KAUST researchers have shown.

Tue 21 Mar 17 from Phys.org

Lust for power: Engineers develop non-toxic material that generates electricity through hot and cold

Thanks to the discovery of a new material by University of Utah engineers, jewelry such as a ring and your body heat could generate enough electricity to power a body sensor, or a cooking pan ...

Mon 20 Mar 17 from Phys.org

Radical new material can charge from heat 

A new material that can generate electricity from heat and cold air has been developed by researchers at the University of Utah, who say it could easily be used to charge a phone from boiling ...

Tue 21 Mar 17 from Daily Mail

Non-toxic material that generates electricity through hot and cold

Salt Lake City UT (SPX) Mar 21, 2017 Thanks to the discovery of a new material by University of Utah engineers, jewelry such as a ring and your body heat could generate enough electricity ...

Sun 26 Mar 17 from SpaceDaily

Lust for power

Thanks to the discovery of a new material by University of Utah engineers, a cooking pan could generate enough electricity to charge a cellphone in just a few hours. The team found that a combination ...

Mon 20 Mar 17 from Eurekalert

Lust for Power, Mon 20 Mar 17 from Newswise

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