Nectar research sheds light on ecological theory

A sticky drop of nectar clinging to the tip of a hummingbird's beak drips into the next flower the bird visits. With that subtle change, the microbes within that drop are now in a new environment, teeming with other microbes. This small example of species forced to coexist in the real world has helped the Fukami Lab at Stanford University unravel the relative importance of two theories scientists have had about how species can live together.

Nectar research sheds light on ecological theory

A sticky drop of nectar clinging to the tip of a hummingbird's beak drips into the next flower the bird visits. With that subtle change, the microbes within that drop are now in a new environment, ...

Mon 11 Jun 18 from Phys.org

Nectar Research Sheds Light on Ecological Theory, Thu 14 Jun 18 from Laboratory Equipment

Stanford nectar research sheds light on ecological theory

Different species almost always coexist -- whether it's big animals on the plains, bugs in a jungle or yeasts in flower nectar -- but how that works is complicated. Now, Stanford researchers ...

Mon 11 Jun 18 from Eurekalert

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