A planetary census puts humans in their place

BILLIONS of years ago a star began to die. In the process, it created something new: 65,500 billion tonnes of carbon that would later be incorporated into the nascent planet Earth. That carbon is still there, and nowadays a fair chunk of it makes up the bodies of living beings. A new study, published this week by Yinon Bar-On and others from the Weizmann Institute of Science, in Israel, provides a comprehensive estimate of how the Earth’s carbon stock is distributed among its inhabitants. By estimating the amount of carbon stored in organisms, otherwise known as biomass, the scientists were able to compare the relative abundance of different kinds of Earth’s life, weighing both the microbes beneath the soil and the giraffes walking above it on the same scale. The mammals known as human beings like to imagine themselves the lords of the planet. But in terms of raw biomass, the results—published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences—tell a different story....

A planetary census puts humans in their place

BILLIONS of years ago a star began to die. In the process, it created something new: 65,500 billion tonnes of carbon that would later be incorporated into the nascent planet Earth. That ...

Thu 24 May 18 from The Economist

Humans account for little next to plants, worms, bugs

When you weigh all life on Earth, billions of humans don't amount to much compared to trees, earthworms or even viruses. But we really know how to throw what little weight we have around, according ...

Mon 21 May 18 from Phys.org

Humans Account for Little Next to Plants, Worms, Bugs, Tue 22 May 18 from Laboratory Equipment

Scientists predict number of undiscovered mammal species

There are probably 303 species of mammals left to be discovered by science, most of which are likely to live in tropical regions, according to a predictive model developed by a team of University ...

Wed 16 May 18 from Phys.org

Scientists Predict Number of Undiscovered Mammal Species, Wed 16 May 18 from Laboratory Equipment

Humanity is just 0.01% of all life but we wiped out 83% of all wild mammals

A new study reveals the staggering disproportionate impact that humanity has on wildlife.

Tue 22 May 18 from ZME Science

Humans account for less than 1% of all life on Earth

While humans only add up to about one ten-thousandth of all life on Earth, researchers say we've helped to wipe out nearly 85% of wild mammals, and slash total weight of plants by half. ...

Mon 21 May 18 from Daily Mail

Earth's undiscovered mammals: Researchers say there are over 300 species left to be discovered

A new predictive model developed by ecologists in the US estimates there are roughly 303 mammal species throughout the world that remain unknown to science. Many of these are likely in the ...

Wed 16 May 18 from Daily Mail

Humans form a minuscule part of life on earth

A first-of-its-kind census says they have outsize influence on fellow creatures

Tue 22 May 18 from The Hindu

Bookmark

Bookmark and Share