The ecological costs of war: Conflict a consistent killer of African megafauna

War’s main effect is killing people, sure — but it also kills wildlife. In Africa, the number of large animals like elephants, zebras, and buffalo can decline as much as 90 percent during wartime, according to new research. But the animals that do survive can rebuild their populations, so conservation efforts in war-torn areas are incredibly important. Researchers looked at thousands of reports about wildlife populations in protected areas in Africa between 1946 and 2010. They found that in peacetime, the number of large herbivores stays largely stable. But even one year of conflict in as little as 20 years causes wildlife to decline, according to the study published today in Nature. The longer the war continues, the steeper the... Continue reading…

The ecological costs of war: Conflict a consistent killer of African megafauna

When Joshua Daskin traveled to Mozambique's Gorongosa National Park in 2012, the park and the iconic large animals that roamed it were returning from the brink of extinction. Gorongosa, among ...

Wed 10 Jan 18 from Phys.org

The ecological costs of war: Conflict a consistent killer of African megafauna, Wed 10 Jan 18 from ScienceDaily

When wildlife conservation meets war

Writing off war-torn conservation sites altogether is a bad idea

Sun 14 Jan 18 from Ars Technica

Warfare in Africa’s protected areas causes wildlife decline

Wildlife is the overlooked casualty of war.

Thu 11 Jan 18 from ZME Science

Elephants, lions and other wild animals are exquisitely sensitive to the effects of war

A little armed conflict can lead to a lot of problems for wild animals like elephants, lions, giraffes and other large mammals, new research shows.

Wed 10 Jan 18 from L.A. Times

Wars kill wildlife in Africa’s protected areas, study finds

Wars or armed conflict of any kind can have just as devastating an impact on wildlife as on people, a new study published in Nature suggests. Warfare can have a range of effects on wild animals: ...

Thu 11 Jan 18 from Mongabay.com

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