Scientists Discovered The Oldest Human Plague. It Took Down Neolithic Farmers And Changed Europe’s History

A team of researchers from France, Sweden, and Denmark have identified a new strain of Yersinia pestis, the bacteria that causes plague, in DNA extracted from 5,000-year-old human remains. Their analyses, publishing December 6 in the journal Cell, suggest that this strain is the closest ever identified to the genetic origin of plague. Their work also suggests that plague may have been spread among Neolithic European settlements by traders, contributing to the settlements' decline at the dawn of the Bronze Age.

A 5,000-year-old mass grave harbors the oldest plague bacteria ever found

DNA from an ancient strain of the plague-causing bacterium could help uncover the origins of the deadly disease.

Thu 6 Dec 18 from ScienceNews

An ancient strain of plague may have led to the decline of Neolithic Europeans

A team of researchers from France, Sweden, and Denmark have identified a new strain of Yersinia pestis, the bacteria that causes plague, in DNA extracted from 5,000-year-old human remains. Their ...

Thu 6 Dec 18 from Phys.org

An ancient strain of plague may have led to the decline of Neolithic Europeans, Thu 6 Dec 18 from ScienceDaily

Scientists find oldest evidence of black plague in 5,000-year-old human remains

The remains of a 20-year-old woman found in Sweden may help scientists retrace the origin of the deadly disease.

Fri 7 Dec 18 from ZME Science

Ancient, Unknown Strain of Plague Found in 5,000-Year-Old Tomb in Sweden

In a nearly 5,000-year-old tomb in Sweden, researchers have discovered the oldest-known strain of the notorious bacterium Yersinia pestis.

Thu 6 Dec 18 from Livescience

Newly discovered plague strain may have decimated Stone Age settlements in Europe

Scientists have discovered one of the earliest and most primitive strains of bacteria responsible for pneumonic plague.

Thu 6 Dec 18 from UPI

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