Why your ancestors would have aced the long jump

A 52-million-year-old ankle fossil suggests our prehuman ancestors were high-flying acrobats. For years, scientists thought the ancestors of today's humans, monkeys, lemurs and apes were relatively slow and deliberate animals, using their grasping hands and feet to creep along small twigs and branches. But a new study suggests the first primates were masters at leaping through the trees.

Why your ancestors would have aced the long jump

A 52-million-year-old ankle fossil suggests our prehuman ancestors were high-flying acrobats.

Mon 11 Sep 17 from Phys.org

Why your ancestors would have aced the long jump, Mon 11 Sep 17 from ScienceDaily

Why Your Ancestors Would Have Aced the Long Jump, Mon 11 Sep 17 from Science Blog

Why your ancestors would have aced the long jump, Mon 11 Sep 17 from Eurekalert

52 million-year-old fossil could rewrite human history

An ankle bone measuring just a quarter of an inch (63cm) uncovered at a quarry near Marseilles, in southeastern France, suggests the earliest primates leapt through the trees.

Tue 12 Sep 17 from Daily Mail

First Primates Were Built for Leaping, Fossil Ankle Suggests

NewsA 52-million-year-old ankle fossil suggests our prehuman ancestors were high-flying acrobats. These first primates spent most of their time in the trees rather than on the ground, but just ...

Tue 12 Sep 17 from Laboratory Equipment

Primate ancestors were nimble acrobats, shows ankle fossil

Paleontologists study 52-million-year-old bone of chipmunk-sized creature

Sat 16 Sep 17 from The Hindu

  • Pages: 1

Bookmark

Bookmark and Share